Art-in-Buildings at 1000M: How to Curate a Private Collection

5 March 2019

When it comes to seeking beauty in their own home, 1000M residents can find inspiration in the privately curated art collection within the building itself. If residents are inspired by the art at 1000M and are looking to start their own collection, here a few steps to get started.

 

Located in the heart of Chicago, 1000M is surrounded by a thriving cultural ecosystem, inviting residents to seek beauty in all the city has to offer. When it comes to seeking beauty in their own home, residents will be able to find aesthetic inspiration in the privately curated art collection within the building itself. The world-class collection at the 1000M Sales Gallery was organized by Jennie Lamensdorf, the Director and Curator of Time Equities Inc. Art-in-Buildings. With a deep resume in curatorial work, Lamensdorf also has an extensive background in art history, with a passion for bringing challenging and engaging work to non-traditional exhibition spaces. If residents are inspired by the art at 1000M and are looking to start their own collection, Lamensdorf has a few tips on how to get started.

 

Dive Into Art

The first step in collecting art is discovering what you like and don’t like, and the only way to do so is to look at a lot of art! Lamensdorf recommends starting with getting some context in art history before you move towards the contemporary scene. The Art Institute of Chicago, within walking distance of 1000M, is a great place to start, and Chicago has an expansive gallery network that’s also worth exploring.

 

“Go with a friend, your kids or your spouse, look at things, talk about whether or not you like the pieces. Once you do that, you begin to develop your taste and figure out what you might want to own and look at every day,” Lamensdorf suggests. Keep in mind: there’s a big difference between art displayed in a gallery and art you would want to wake up to every day. That distinction may help narrow down your options.

 

Make a Budget

Deciding on a yearly budget helps you allot the amount for each piece you purchase. “You can buy art at all price points,” Lamensdorf explains, which can often depend on materials. Works on paper are going to be less expensive, but if you just love the look of canvas paintings, don’t shy away from them. Whether your budget is $1,000 a year or $10,000 or even more, there’s art out there for a range of prices.

 

Start with Early Career Artists

When it comes to being on the cutting-edge of the art scene and staying within your budget, getting to know early-to-mid-career artists gives you an advantage. Lamensdorf suggests, “it’s a more accessible way into collecting, you can get to know the artist,” which gives your collection some added backstory and more personal frame of reference. Favorite artists may help you pinpoint favorite galleries, and building a relationship with a gallery is a great way to grow your collection.

 

Don’t Try to Purchase for Profit

While this might sound like a great idea in theory, flipping art to make a profit is incredibly difficult. “It’s terribly hard to do,” Lamensdorf explains, “and for all the success stories you see in movies and read about in the press, you should buy the things that you love and make your life better.” In the wise words of Marie Kondo, only purchase what sparks joy.

 

Stay tuned for more articles to come on our Art-in-Buildings at 1000M series!